The Baby Boomer, Gen Y communications gap and social media … the solution or the problem?

I got up this morning at 4:30am – and as I do every morning, I attacked my “1st thing To Do in the morning task.”  Today it was clean out the people I follow on Twitter.  I was getting to the point where I couldn’t even delve into the links because there was too much stuff – stuff I had no room in my brain for.

One thing I found myself doing today was taking a look at the age demographics of the people I followed.  I’m a generational analysis freak, so I got off on this.  Out of the 100 or so people I follow, I found that they were pretty much equally distributed after taking out my industry related stuff.  I have about the same amount of Baby Boomers, Generation X and Gen Y tweeters.  As a reference point:  I’m fifty-one, on the cusp of the Boomers and Gen X.

This got me thinking:  Is this a normal distribution?  After looking into who the people who I followed, I looked to who they followed.  I surmised that I wasn’t the norm.  Humans have a tendency to gravitate towards comfort.  And comfort normally lies with those of similar age.  My observations backed this up.

Now this bring us to this post.

As we all know, the mechanics of communication and socialization have changed greatly with the advent of social media.  God, Facebook has 500 million members, Twitter has almost 100 million and LinkedIn has 80 million.  Countless people all over the world spend countless hours tweeting, following, connecting and friending.

The generation gap

Social media has been touted as bringing the world together – connecting people from disparate cultures and enabling them to get to know each other.  But how much “bringing together” is actually actually going on.  From a geographic sense, sure.  But other than that … is social media bridging a communication gap – or is it creating one.

As I mentioned above, according to my informal research, people are spending more time with others in their own age group due to the time they spend on social media sites.  In “the old days,” we made contact with people of all ages because … well, because we just physically ran into them.  When we were teenagers, if we went to our friends’ houses – we saw and talked to their parents.  With no social media, any contact we would have would have to be either on the phone (normally limited because of only having one house phone) or in person.  If you didn’t get out in the real world, you didn’t socialize.  Remember the term “homebody?”

Seldom do the younger people have contact with the people my age, and vice versa.  On the surface this might not seem like a big deal.  There’s always been generation gaps.  But never has there been an opportunity like this with the ubiquity of social media and the connection and communication possibilities it brings.

And not only are we not taking advantage of it … we’re using it to our disadvantage.

The young need mentoring.  They need to hear stories about what happens if they do stupid things.  The need to know that life is not a straight line, but rather a series of ups and downs and cycles.  And the Baby Boomers like me need the nieve optimism that we once had but has now been replaced by risk aversion.  We need the energy.  We need to know that we may be 50 or 60, but we sure as hell don’t have to feel and act like that.  Satchel Paige once posed the question, “How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you were?”

I participate in four social media venues:  LinkedIn, Facebook, Brazen Careerists and Twitter.  Let me tell you how I see these four shaking out from a generational perspective.

  1. LinkedIn: As my twenty year old daughter says – LinkedIn is Facebook for old people.  That kind says it all.  Since it’s broken down primarily by professions, I associate with those within profession, digital printing and database marketing.  I would guess the average age is just about my age or maybe a year or two older, within little age diversity.  I also belong to a social media group.  Average here is about fifteen to twenty years younger – and again with little generational crossover.  In summary … I talk to people may age.
  2. Facebook: I don’t really spend much time here.  My only contacts are mainly those people I went to high school with – my age.  And because of the requirement to approve any “friends,” you circle is probably pretty closed and limited to your real world friends.   Any chance meeting with somebody of another age group is small.
  3. Brazen Careerists: This is a site populated mainly by Gen Yers.  Most of them are go getters and I joined to get the “younger” perspective on things.  A lot of the conversation centers around careers (thus the name) and how to move ahead.  My question is, how can a bunch of twenty somethings give career advice when they’re in the middle of the process themselves.  There’s a resume forum which drives me crazy.  “Employers don’t hire resumes … they hire people.”  I know this may sound trite but the focus should be on making contact with those people in the hiring positions (not human resources).  And these people are my age, 50+, or at the least Gen Xers in their late 30s and 40s.
  4. Twitter: This is my favorite – and until this morning I really didn’t know why.  Now I do.  I can follow and listen to whoever I want to.  And anybody can follow me and listen to what I say.  There are blocking features, but who actually uses them.  As I said at the beginning of this post, my Twittering is “equal opportunity across all age groups.”  I like this.

As you can see, with the exception of Twitter, social media (at least the ones I use) restricts intellectual diversity as much if not more than they accommodate it.

OK, enough of the problem.  Let’s fix the game. Together we can all find a phone booth and put on our capes.  Here’s my solution on using social media to bridge the gap.

First for us old people.

  1. Get on Twitter.  Forage around and open your mind to things that you wouldn’t normally.  Follow young people.  Especially for motivation.  Start with @marsdorian and @jennifer_good.  If you can’t make it happen after reading their stuff – go back to bed and start over.  If you find somebody you like, see who they’re following and get their inspiration from.  Try to follow people across the age spectrum equally.
  2. For all you LinkedIn and Facebook people and followers of other permission based sites:  Find people in the real world and on Twitter and invite them to be your friend and /or connection.  Now I’m talking about people of other generations.  Because of the viral nature of social media, people you bring into your circle will automatically be exposed to your existing group and your existing group to them – and your efforts will be leveraged.
  3. This isn’t really a social media thing but I’m including it anyway.  Listen to music outside your comfort zone, i.e. the stuff the kids are listening too.  “It’s the best way to bridge the communication chasm.”

Now to all you Gen Yers, yes Alexandria – you too … you’re not off the hook.  You have to meet us half way.

  1. Join LinkedIn.  Facebook is not the “be all end all.”  Maybe if you expose some “parent types” to your rambling  machinations, you’ll clean things up a bit.  Just maybe. The more the “old people” (the people who will make your career) are exposed to you the more opportunities you will have.
  2. Get on Twitter.  Again Facebook is not the “be all end all.”  See above for my reasons.
  3. And finally … phones still work.  You can still text your friends till your fingers fall off, but don’t let your vocal skill set totally petrify.  Us “old people” still use the phone.  And at last notice, I don’t think texting has evolved into an mainstream interview tool.

I don’t know much protection these suggestions are going to have against the kryptonite of the social media segregation … but it’s better than just continuing down the road of the status quo.

Enough of my ramblings … I have to get back to Eminem.

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If you like this … please Tweet it and follow me on Twitter @clayforsberg

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Brilliant self-promotion … or egotism?

I find this whole personal branding thing that’s hot right now very interesting.  With all the social media and visibility outlets available, i.e. Facebook, LinkedIN, Twitter, etc., one came spend so time branding, that there’s no time for anything else.  It’s not uncommon for twenty-five year old kids to have 500 Facebook friends and 5000 Twitter followers.  And aside from time, this exposure costs them nothing.  Now whether they do anything with it … another story.

Back when I was twenty-five, twenty-five years ago (interesting how that calculated), there wasn’t any social media.  What are you going to get your name out there … put a poster of your mug on a telephone pole on the way to the local party destination?  The best you could hope for is your friends wrote your number down on a piece of paper and hung next to the their home phone on the wall.  Now a wall is a Facebook homepage.

This brings me to the point of this post. The last year, I’ve been delving into the current music scene.  Through Alex, my daughter (age twenty), I’ve received a crash course.

Eminem

One thing I’ve noticed is a lot of the current top performers say their name in their songs; Lady Gaga, Jason Deroa, Soulja Boy, Ludacris and so on.  Now what’s prompting this recent trend.  This never happened back in my day.  In fact I don’t even remember it happening even five years ago.  You had Eminem and his alter-ego Slim Shady.  But that was a character – not so much an exercise in self-promotion.

Alex’s friend, Jason, attributes it to egotism.  Jason, do I sense a bit of jealousy … maybe just a bit.? Maybe he’s right.  There’s been a ton of articles written recently on this age group, Generation Y.  They’re lazy, they feel they’re entitled, etc.  Funny how the authors of these articles are all Baby Boomers, go figure!

Now it brings us to the question … “Brilliant self-promotion or egotism?”

In this day and age, we are bombarded with stimuli.  There’s more information than we know what to do with.  To try to get yourself into line to be heard is … well, enough said.

But there’s another thing I noticed different in the music industry these days – specifically on radio.  Now with the iPod, you know what song is playing, who’s playing it, what album it’s on and in lot of case what the album cover looks like.  Recognition isn’t an issue … or is it?

Take my situation.  I have an iPod, but it’s a Shuffle.  It has no screen, only buttons.  I don’t know who’s playing what.  I downloaded songs from my daughter and my memory isn’t quite what was :-(.  But I’m in the vast minority here.  Virtually nobody has the iPod Shuffle, just me.

But here’s the kicker, back to the radio. I listen to the radio … and whole lot of other people do too.  This is where we are exposed to music that we will ultimately buy and put on our computers and iPods.  These days they don’t tell you who playing the song anymore! I can’t count the number of time I’ve called a radio station to find out who played a song I liked that I heard.

Maybe Lady Gaga, Ludacris and a lot of the other mega-stars realized this too?  If they don’t promote their brand in their product … who’s going to know it’s them (especially in the early stages of their careers)?

Brilliant self-promotion … or egotism?  I’d say the former.

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If you like this … please Tweet it and follow me on Twitter @clayforsberg

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Eminem – if we pay attention, there’s plenty to learn

Yesterday I was reading a blog, copyblogger.com, in an attempt to hone my writing skills.  One post caught my attention.  “What we can learn about writing and marketing from Eminem.

The master marketer

Now, most of you will cringe and say – absolutely nothing.  But put away your walker for minute and open your mind.

I did … and it was worth it.

http://www.copyblogger.com/eminem/

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