Moving Beyond The Movement

Well here it is, May of 2018, and we’re six months away from the mid-term elections. We have descended into Dante’s Hell of campaign missives. All news is to now to be framed in a political narrative – yet none of it is really informing us to make better decisions at the polls. Combine this bi-annual event with Trump being at the helm of this Titanic of a federal government … and retaining ones sanity is easier said than done.

Here in Billings, Montana, I’m subjected to a daily barrage of GOP hopefuls on full display strutting their stuff in hopes of uprooting the Democratic incumbent Senator Jon Tester. You have Troy Downing, out-Trumping even the orange clown himself – trying dearly to conjure up a bucket of patriotism by enlisting Mike, the felon, Flynn on the campaign trail. Not to be outdone, we have Billings’ own former judge Russell Fagg. His message to the world is death to them murdering marauders from south of the border. But of course the vengeance will have to wait until after his weekly morning prayer meeting for the local business community. God help us all please … as I cry from the depths of Circle Five and the River of Styx just hoping Cheron the oarsman doesn’t toss me overboard with the other wallowing souls. Come to think of it … put me out of my misery.

Regardless of what end of this ideological political absurdity you reside – there’s still one question virtually no one asks. Can these politicians subjecting us to all of this narcissistic babble do the job they so desperately want. We just had the Tester/Trump battle over Trump’s pick for the VA, Ronny Jackson. All the attention was on whether on his character was suitable; as if that has really mattered for any of Trump’s other picks. While this definitely should be addressed – shouldn’t also the fact the man had nowhere near the background to do a job like this. Nothing indicates any level of ability coinciding with the magnitude of running the VA. Unfortunately this is normally always the case. Ideology trumps ability.

Corporations and business have interview processes that hopeful identify competent candidates and then from there a qualified decision is made. This isn’t always the case, but at least the attempt is there. Politics doesn’t work that way. And unfortunately neither do social movements and cause-based activism.

Let’s look at gun control efforts. Since Columbine, there’s been many opportunities to launch strikes against the NRA and those beholden to them. In addition to Columbine, the Gabby Giffords’ shooting and Sandy Hook being two in particular. None of them have really gained any traction. They have NGOs set up and I’m sure there are people out making an effort, but if anything the gun lobby is as strong now than ever. Donna Dees wrote an interesting article for Fast Company, just yesterday on her experience founding the Million Moms March after Columbine. She blames branding primarily for its lack of being able to “change the game.” I think it goes a lot deeper than that.

Now we have the #MarchForOurLives student crusade that seems to be making some headway. The founding high school students from Parkland, Florida have social media followings several times that of any effort to date. They may also be more organizationally adept than any other movement also … believe it or not. We’ll see how this all plays out come November and the midterm elections though. I’m hoping to be pleasantly surprised.

Let’s not forget Occupy Wall Street and all the other hundreds of Occupys. This was supposed to be the start of a decentralized push to bring down “the man.” No one was in charge, so all participating voices would be heard and no one could be targeted by the establishment. Emotional momentum is a hard thing to maintain though. This is especially the case if there’s no one leading when the inevitable push back comes from those in the status quo who are affected.

Historian Bill Moyer wrote an excellent account of movements called, History is a Weapon: A Movement Action Plan.” Moyer’s essay is a strategic framework describing the eight stages of successful social movements. Moyer outlines the decades long fights for the curtailment of  nuclear power in American. He details the eight stages activists and their opponents battled through. The piece is a must read for anyone who wishes to make it a life protesting against “the man” … and a life it is. Ask anyone fighting for a woman’s right to choose. Just when you think the battle is done and you can finally go home and put your feet up … out pops the latest reincarnation of pathetic sexist zealotry.

Another movement I’ve been following is #MeToo. For all accounts, it should succeed. It has potentially huge numbers with what should be virtually all women and the men who aren’t assholes. That said, what’s actually happening though? What’s being accomplished? We’ve had some women come up publicly and face their abusers. We had a favorable Bill Cosby verdict (which I attribute to #MeToo). But what about women’s equality in the workplace. What’s the game plan by those in charge? Is there anyone in charge? Unfortunately these questions are all too common.

Social movements normally arise out of nowhere with a tsunami of momentum – only to burnout just as fast. There will be a few people who will hang on, create an organization and try to stay relevant. Is anything accomplished … normally not. Implementation is hard, and those who ignite a movement (if many can even be called that) are not qualified or have the resources to sustain it once the media and its twenty-four hour news cycle moves on. These people are not hired to run and grow an organization like those hired to run a corporation. They weren’t chosen … most often the movement chose them.

New Power … and maintaining the momentum

Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms just released an excellent book called “New Power,” which has been getting a lot of attention. Jeremy’s organization, Purpose, has been groundbreaking in its support for “new power” efforts worldwide. And Henry made a historical impact with Giving Tuesday. New Power is a manual for anyone who wishes to create change through the empowerment of the “people in the street” in their battle against the status quo of what they call Old Power.

For most of human history, the rules of power were clear: power was something to be seized and then jealously guarded. This “old power” was out of reach for the vast majority of people. But our ubiquitous connectivity makes possible a different kind of power. “New power” is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It works like a current, not a currency–and it is most forceful when it surges. The battle between old and new power is determining who governs us, how we work, and even how we think and feel. (Amazon description)

Now let’s say we all follow Jeremy and Henry’s book – very well we could see results and things might start changing. But ultimately it’s going to come down to actions and leadership of a few to organize, and keep the momentum going. This is not easy and much of the time – it takes what seems like forever – as Bill Moyer so aptly chronicled with the anti-nuclear movement

Wael Ghonim, the main instigator (and I say that in the best possible terms) in the Arab Spring protests articulated the Participation Scale in tweet outlining the multiple steps we can take to sustain a movement.

Ghonim’s suggestions are excellent when it comes to making the movement go – and keep it going. But what happens after the movement? How do we keep the supply of devoted coming, not just for this cause – but for other causes that should follow? How do we create a fertile ground where there is always the manpower to fight that next worthy cause.

But it’s not enough to just have these often random and reactionary outbursts against the Old Power of the status quo. We need a new societal mindset that doesn’t default towards conformity and obedience to Old Power institutions in the first place. Today we have the modern-day Gutenberg printing press in everyone’s hand – social media. The potential is there to create a new way. We just have to decide that we’re willing to do it.

We need to create a new civic norm and power structure that isn’t so much a structure, but a flow. And specifically we need a flow that comes not through the whims and selfish obsessions of “representatives” (and I use that word loosely). We need direct response that truly represents an engaged populace. The advantage will go to those who are engaged, connected and informed; not naive and obedient to a “higher power” that falsely claims the path to the promised land.

Rhizomes and Decentralized Civic Engagement

An increasing mass of people agree that long term human survival depends on us replacing the status quo with a fundamentally different set of behaviours and structures. I believe the root of that challenge is essentially cultural, and the best place to grow culture is in small groups. And until we’ve got a critical mass of activists that are embedded in a new way of thinking, relating and communicating, any mass movement is going to replicate the errors of the past. (5 Reasons to Build a Network of Small Groups – Richard Bartlett)

___________________

Biologists say trees are social beings. They can count learn and remember. They nurse sick members, warn each other of dangers by sending electrical signals across a fungal network and for reasons unknown, keep the ancient stumps of long felled companions alive for centuries by feeding them a sugar solution through roots. (Marije van Zomeren)

We need to look no further than our backyard to find a perfect example of decentralized civic participation. One of nature’s most effective means of sustainability is the rhizome. The rhizome is a modified subterranean stem of a plant that is usually found underground, often sending out roots and shoots from its nodes. Rhizomes develop from axillary buds and grow perpendicular to the force of gravity. The rhizome retains the ability to allow new shoots to grow upwards, giving rise to a new node of above ground activity.

rhizome
Credit: Debi Keyte-Hartland

“A rhizome ceaselessly establishes connections between semiotic chains, organizations of power, and circumstances relative to the arts, sciences, and social struggles … the rhizome connects any point to any other point, and its traits are not necessarily linked to traits of the same nature; it brings into play very different regimes of signs, and even non-sign states … The rhizome operates by variation, expansion, conquest, capture, offshoots.” A rhizome has no beginning or end; it is always in the middle, between things, interbeing, intermezzo. (A Thousand Plateaus)

This phenomena of decentralized activity in rhizomes was best articulated in the philosophy or Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari in the ’60s. Rather than using the organizational structure of the root-tree system which  looks for the single origin of “things” and looks towards conclusion of those “things,” a rhizome continually establishes connections between threads of meaningful communication, organizations of power, and other influences (including arts, sciences, and social struggles). The planar movement of the rhizome resists chronology and formal organization, instead favoring a Nomadic system of growth and proliferation. In this model, influence and application spreads like a body of water, occupying available spaces or in the application of community – maximizing the resources available to it, regardless of the type. This is a perfect alternative to the morass of governmental hierarchical dysfunction we’re current immersed in.

Front Porches

In every town and every neighborhood are places where informal leaders go to hang out and do the real business of the town. In Minot, North Dakota where I grew up, we had Charlie’s restaurant and the Elks Lodge. These were the places where the “business of the community” was done (not at the city council meetings). This is where ideas were hatched and where the future of Minot was mapped out … often under the influence of a libation or two.

These informal meeting places, most often locally owned businesses, are what I call Front Porches, named after the front yard gathering spots so often seen in Latino communities that are used for neighborhood discussion and connection to the street. These Front Porches are where the Middle Ring flourishes and what the French political philosopher, Alex de Tocqueville, observed in the 1800’s as the source of America’s “inclusive exceptionalism.”

Your neighborhood’s Front Porch can be anywhere or anything. It can be the local pub down the street or the coffee-house where you get your morning sustenance from. It can be Bill’s garage where everyone gathers to watch Sunday football games. It can even be your kitchen table. What happens at the Front Porch is what matters … not what is looks like or where it is. These Front Porches are what provides the bridge from the naturalistic examples of the rhizome organization articulated by Deleuze and Guattari and your community’s civic sustainability.

Growing New Power In Your Community

With a rhizome-based civic philosophy built around your community’s Front Porch network, the foundation has been laid for a sustainable implementation of New Power; one that will endure well beyond a single movement or display of activism. Your activism will be organized, but not from a conventional hierarchical sense, but rather from a case-by-case basis emanating from Front Porch tactical execution.

In the end, the effectiveness of a movement is dependent on more than structure. It needs the strength and abilities of the individual members of your community. It needs talent. This talent also needs to be schooled in the functions and use of New Power. Just as important though is training future members and new generations to keep the cause going. This is where long-term thinking and a decentralized activist game plan is needed. Sustained engagement requires a learned mindset of change, one that stresses inclusive involvement by all members of the community, regardless of age, gender, or socioeconomic level. Imagine if Front Porches were used as the classrooms and incubators honing the skills for mindsets of change, encouraging engagement at any level; be it simple participation, project organization and even social movement development.

Nurturing “Civic Self-Efficacy”

Now imagine this effort to build “civic self-efficacy” was a concerted effort nationwide, if not worldwide. The Front Porch concept scales well beyond neighborhood businesses in single communities. As long as the tenets of rhizomatic growth is adhered to, and local issues and needs prioritized – why can’t community empowerment scale worldwide? 

Why can’t a farmer from Oregon, via their Front Porch, share a success story with farmer from Nigeria via theirs. Their civic needs and resource availabilities may be different, but the serendipitous sharing of insight could “turn on the light;” solving a problem with a solution not otherwise seen. And why do we limit collaboration to only those of common vocations when anyone, anywhere of any profession should cross-pollinate and share solutions to civic fixes in their respective locales. Why can’t our worldwide Front Porch network establish a civic empowerment help line. In fact the Parkland kids behind the #MarchForOurLives have done exactly that. They created Outreach For Our Lives to answer questions and lend assistance to student leaders setting up and running their own local chapters of gun control activism.

We need to find organizers in our communities’ Front Porches who can lead, much like the students of Parkland. We then need these leaders to train and mobilize fellow members and friends from these Front Porches … seeding the process to continue on. The act of activism is preparation for more activism. So in essence, a movement is not just cause or content, but rather a platform to individually build civic muscles, or “civic self-efficacy.” Collectively we can then build an organization (and database) that can be mobilized for additional movements, causes and even structural changes. And with each movement and each participation our collective New Power strengthens and proliferates. No longer will we be dependent on the illusion of the “man on the white horse” riding in to save us. We will save ourselves!

We must evolve, individually and collectively – even if some don’t seem to think so. But to do this, we will have to change our thinking. Instead of relying on past expectations and cultural assumptions as our guides — we must envision what could be …. not just what always has been.

But the vision is only part of the journey. We have to look past how things in past have been done. No longer should the Old Power of government and traditional institutions be looked at as our first line defense … rather should be looked at only as a last resort. Our reaction should be to assemble our friends and neighbors at our local Front Porch, organize and flex our New Power muscle.

We can make the change we need — but it won’t be by thinking the way we’ve always thought, and doing what we’ve always done … the way it’s always been done.

“If not us … then who? If not now … then when?”

___________________

If you’re interested in moving on from the status quo – join me in building a New Power coalition in your community … one that is more representative, inclusive and equitable. Please check out Community 3.0, my vision of an evolved society where self-efficacy and well-being is priority.

I can be reached via email me, at clayforsberg@gmail.com and we can set up time to have a conversation.

___________________

Related Posts:

Advertisements

New Power! Using Those In The Streets To Make Change

Since Donald Trump has taken office, we’ve seen the streets of America come alive in ways we haven’t since the Vietnam protests of the ’60s. Last year millions protested in the #MeToo movement and for the rights of women. This year we’ve seen the students of #NeverAgain take their turn in like numbers to protest the insane gun culture that has infected the United States. And just last month, teachers in Oklahoma and West Virginia and beyond protest the equally insane disregard this country has for funding education. The country has had it. We are no longer willing to idly sit by and let this decimation of democracy continue brought on by Washington D.C. and state capitals nationwide.

In my last post I followed the lead of Parkland organizer Jaclyn Corin and implored we get up and scream at the healthcare industry for their refusal to make any effort in fixing the bloated fiefdom they’ve created. Now I’m asking for a new target to scream at: the Democratic party.

Now it’s easy to target the GOP. I’m not to go into why. Let’s just say – it’s been said, in copious detail – starting with Trump. The Democratic party on the other hand has been getting a free pass during this year of civil awakening. It’s time for us to rethink this though. The absence of their formal endorsement of either the striking teachers or the #NeverAgain kids is conspicuous.

Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms just released an excellent book called “New Power,” which has been getting a lot of attention. I’ve known Jeremy’s organization, Purpose is groundbreaking in its support for “new power” efforts worldwide. “New Power” is a manual for anyone who wishes to create change through the efforts and empowerment of the “people in the street” in their battle against the status quo of what they call Old Power.

For most of human history, the rules of power were clear: power was something to be seized and then jealously guarded. This “old power” was out of reach for the vast majority of people. But our ubiquitous connectivity makes possible a different kind of power. “New power” is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It works like a current, not a currency–and it is most forceful when it surges. The battle between old and new power is determining who governs us, how we work, and even how we think and feel. (Amazon description)

Political parties have traditionally concerned themselves with the money and big backers of Old Power. They believe the road to personal and political power is paved by those outside of government in the private sector who hold the gold and silver. Once in a while a politician tries the buck the system and enroll the actual people in their cause – but the gale winds of Old Power eventually knocks the effort of course careening it in the rocks only to sink like yet another ship of democracy at the bottom of the political sea. Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign of 2016 was a perfect example of this. Just when Sanders’ campaign was gaining momentum, Democratic kingmaker Debbie Wasserman Schultz extinguished it by cutting off access to the supposedly unbiased national party database and voter logs. These shenanigans would eventually get her tossed from her perch as the national party chair. But alas … the damage was done, Sanders stalled and Hillary Clinton was awarded the nomination. Now every morning we wake up to clown tweets … each one more absurd than the last.

Even without Wasserman Schultz – would Sanders have won the nomination? Probably not. I don’t believe he was the right vehicle to rally the “new power” to a level where it could have successfully scaled the castle walls of Old Power. Heimans and Timms believe change only occurs when a movement has garnered both enough Old Power and New Power to topple the status quo. Sanders didn’t have enough of either. Does the #MeToo movement or #NeverAgain or the teachers have enough ground-level support as well as traditional affluence to affect change. We’ll see.

That said, the GOP – helped by the extremist positions of anti-gun control NRA adherents along with religious zealots protesting abortion, Planned Parenthood or most anything else they deem a violation of their mutated take on the bible … have succeeded in rallying their disciples. Instant mobilization of this “new power” working in unison with bought and paid for politicians in all levels of government have taken the castle and turned it into a modern-day Caligula.

In the case of the NRA, much ado is made about how much they donate to political candidates – their Old Power. But where their real effect lies is in their New Power, or ability to rally their membership (as well as other gun owners) by using paranoia and scare tactics. Regardless of their views on other issues – the NRA faithful come out in droves to vote on that one thing – keeping their guns, however credible that threat may or may not be. The GOP have the NRA and the abortion foes at their disposal for New Power. These one issue voters will overlook any shortcomings, or horribleness in the case of Roy Moore and their other white-supremacists candidates, if they align on these two issues.

The Democrats, well I don’t what the hell they’re doing. They couldn’t ask for a better opportunity for a rallying cry. By Democrats, I don’t necessarily mean all of the individual candidates. I’m referring to the party establishment and the politicians that have been running it for decades. Few of these career power mongers have any idea what’s going on in the streets, let alone respect their efforts and take an encouraging role. The primary driver behind the New Power efforts has been social media. Most of those in the party establishment look at it as a threat, not an asset or a tool. Even though much their constituency lives on it (young people and technologically adept educated professionals) – few of those in the ivory towers can coherently compose an original tweet that isn’t self aggrandizing promotion.

Now what’s up here? Why hasn’t the Democrat power structure embraced this display of New Power? The logical answer is that the Democrat party, like the GOP, is beholden to corporate interests for campaign donations. The Democratic party steadfastly stands behind the House leadership of Nancy Pelosi due to her fundraising prowess. This is definitely Old Power thinking. It’s all about the money. The irony of the situation is money is only as good as it’s ability to deliver votes. And the votes of the current Democratic party are not to be had through traditional media buys and party bosses. It’s about making yourself relevant, accessible and immediate to the voters through the media of THEIR choosing – which is Twitter, Facebook and Instagram … not CBS, NBC and ABC.

The streets are full of voters who have passion for change in areas of gun control, women rights, education … but the Democratic party hasn’t joined them in this passion. This New Power is already organized and mobilized – and waiting for the members of the Old Power they can get behind. This is even more bewildering in the fact that these movements are intertwined. To sit on the sidelines while these voters, present and future, are “screaming” to be heard and represented is frustrating.

___________________

But just because we’re frustrated in the Democratic party or even the GOP if you believe in its older version of fiscal conservatism, not moral hypocrisy (back when it was a sensible alternative) – we shouldn’t dismay.

Politics aside, what can we do with this concept of New Power. Up to this point we’ve talked about New Power in the context of trying to get people, mainly politicians and elected officials, to do things for us. But how can we use this power of activism and engagement for direct civic action.

Instead of just lobbying for more money for education – why not organize a mentoring program implemented by you and your fellow community members. Every community, regardless of it socioeconomic level has human resources that go untapped just because they don’t fit into the normal realm of government-run programs. For example: the generational disconnect of retired people and adolescents is a crime of waste of resources that we can not afford to ignore any longer.

Instead of just lobbying for more money for elder care, what’s stopping you and your friends at your local watering hole from organizing a food give-away for elderly people and shut-ins. Or why not set-up a weekly coffee delivery for those who don’t get out, isolated from friends and family – if they even have any.

Instead of lobbying for legislation for equal pay across all genders – you and your neighbors should patronize those businesses that provide it without being legally forced to. And by the same token – those businesses who don’t should be shunned and avoided. No one’s forcing you to shop at the sexist bigot down the street. Hit them where it hurts most – their business.

Not all change can happen at street level through direct civic engagement though. Changes in federal laws – such as immigration policy, and international trade pacts can only be affected through lobbying and getting legislators to do the right thing.

But still, amazing things can happen without legislation. We just have to open our eyes to the possibilities.

In 1986, John Gage, then of Sun Microsytems, organized NetDay in California. NetDay was historic grassroots effort in the classic American barn-raising tradition. Using volunteer labor, their goal was to install all the basic wiring needed to make five classrooms and a library or a computer lab in every school Internet-ready. If the same work was financed by taxpayers, it would cost more than $1,000 per classroom. Volunteers from businesses, education, and the community acquired all of the equipment and installed and tested it at each school site. As a result 20,000 volunteers helped to wire 20 percent of California schools to the Internet. In addition, by bringing together these diverse elements, NetDay established a framework for lasting partnerships among business, government, educational institutions, and local communities provide ongoing support for the schools to this day.

And John Gage didn’t have Twitter and Facebook.

___________________

If you’re interested in moving on from the status quo that will inevitably take anyone and anything down with it … please check out Community 3.0, my vision of an evolved society where self-efficacy and well-being is priority. Or even better email me, at clayforsberg@gmail.com and we can set up time to have a conversation.

___________________

Related Posts:

Hobbes, Hume … and Healthcare

A recent 60 Minutes episode on the Stoneman Douglas leaders of the #neveragain movement included a discussion with Emma Gonzales’ mother. We stand behind her, Emma’s mother’s friends said. “You go out and get that law changed. But where are we – we should have done this 20 years ago.” – was the elder Gonzales’ response.

In the six weeks since the Parkland shooting, the kids of the #neveragain movement have successfully waged war on the ridiculous gun promiscuity in the this county. They’ve helped spearhead a nationwide student walkout that took place in over 3000 schools. On March 24th, a week ago, they organized the March For Our Lives in Washington D.C. and over 800 other cities worldwide. Crowd estimates in D.C. alone were over 700,000. Limited gun control legislature has been passed in several states as well as nationally. These kids of the “no fear” generation have become the adults in the room – while the adults are at the kids table throwing peas at each other.

The older generations in power are standing behind the kids. But that’s as far as it goes. As adults we sit by paralyzed – hoping the kids will fix the problems we created. We’ve become fat and lazy. We complain about special interests in government yet we keep electing the same clowns. We complain about the Russians manipulating our beloved Facebook news feeds getting us to believe some nonsense that any 12 old year with common sense wouldn’t fall for. The fat from our McDonalds quarter pounders has seeped into our brains and made us functionally illiterate barely able to conduct our daily lives without help. So instead we look for a crutch – “the man in the white hat … riding in on the white horse.”

The most basic of human instincts is fear. And fear was the main reason Trump was elected … and now it has become an integral part of our society. We’re so scared we don’t even try to think whether the perceived threat is real. The prospect of the bogeyman under the bed dictates our daily decision-making. Trump and his GOP minions are portraying anyone and anything that isn’t white and god-fearing as being evil and out to take your job, your right to the American dream … and most importantly your guns.

America’s Cable News Democracy

“Nothing pains some people more than having to think.” – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Politics is no longer something we participate in. It’s something we observe from our living room couch while watching whatever cable news channel we’ve become addicted to. We take sides with our television remote and go to battle on Facebook and Twitter slinging mud via anonymous usernames like @JesusLovesGuns. The actual work of civics and building of communities – we have no time for that. @JesusLovesGuns has too much work to do battling the hordes of teenage heathens out to impose their George Soros implanted communist mind control on us true patriots. God, guns and good old American whiteness … that’s what we’re here for. In the end though, we know the “big man” in the White House will do the real work for us … white hat and white horse right along with him.

After all, we’re American and we deserve it. We deserve it all. It’s our birthright. The government (even though we hate it) is here to ensure our American Dream – regardless what decisions we personally make. The idea we would band together and work ourselves to create something for the collective good – no that’s not how it works. We got the White House, the white hat and white horse.

Health and the Fallacy of Care

But our abdication of responsibilities doesn’t end with our misconstruct of civic duty. Maybe more impactful than America’s distorted opinion of democracy – is its view of health and the role we play in our own. We’ve elevated the profession of medicine to unhealthy levels. Most of us, no matter how intelligent we may be, seem to turn off our brains when in the presence of a doctor. And if it’s not bad enough that we stand there self-imposed intellectually naked – we’re rarely thrown a metaphorical robe … instead peppered with jargon and really, really big words designed only to intimidate us. Claustrophobic nondescript exam rooms, and accompanying clinical props create the psychological equivalent of an alligator-filled moat separating us from parity and any human aspects of the experience.

I don’t mean to be insinuating that physicians aren’t caring (most are) and empathetic (many are). Instead I want to bring to light the role of the ill-designed concept of Electronic Health Records. Fueling this physician/patient disconnect is the abomination otherwise know as EHR systems. These EHRs are billing software that have morphed into the central nervous system for the convergence between computer technology and healthcare. They are universally hated by practitioners, but the C-Suite continues to pile them on, oblivious to the detrimental effects they have on the health of the life blood of the their organizations – physicians. These EHR systems now dictate the parameters of the physician/patient relationship. It’s like physicians have given up and turned their careers and the healthcare industry over to the Boss Hoggs in the C-Suite. But the true losers are patients. Instead of ways to restore humanity to the healthcare process, all I hear are high-tech bells and whistles like AI, VR and blockchain. I’m as technical as anyone – but is the solution really to add more technology on top of a fundamentally flawed foundation to start with.

The technical solutions I see having have promise are related to patient engagement and collaboration, mainly communication-based behavior modification. But even here – imagination is lacking. Most firms seem to be focused on creating apps reminding us taking take our pills. It’s probably no surprise that the when discussing careers in healthcare, we say medicine. Instead of saying they were in medicine, imagine if a doctor said they were in the field well-being and self-efficacy enhancement. You’d tell them to take a pill.

I find it bizarre when it come to healthcare we feel the need for patient advocates. Do we have advocates for our experience at McDonalds or 7-Eleven? It’s not like we’re given our healthcare for free. On the contrary, the healthcare industry should have advocates to justify their unaccountable high prices. Unlike any other industry, we can’t describe ourselves as customers. It’s akin to blasphemy. Being a customer means we have a choice and that alters the balance of power. Whether intentional or not – the concept of patient subservience is baked into the healthcare model. In some cases it applies and needs to … but in most it’s purely a choice (or lack of) we make when we personally define what health and being healthy means to each of us.

I feel like we’re dogs walking around with leashes around our necks only there’s no one holding onto the other side. We just assume there is. In fact we just assume that’s someone holding onto the leash in most everything we do. In fact it’s so bad that we spend our days conforming to societal norms and expectations. We seldom think about where they came from or question whether they have relevance today. Conformity is what we strive for

Locus of Control, Hobbes and Hume

In 1966, renowned behavioral scientist Julian Rotter developed the concept of locus of control – a variable that describes individual differences between people. Based on this concept, people vary in terms of the degree to which they have an internal locus of control (meaning that they believe that outcomes in their world follow from their personal actions) versus those who have an external locus of control (meaning that they believe that outcomes in their world are generally unrelated to their personal actions). If you have an internal locus of control, you are confident that your actions will lead to change. But if you have external locus of control, you might not even bother trying, because you have learned across your life that little follows from your actions. (Psychology Today)

This tradition of giving way to the external locus of control is rooted in the philosophies of Englishman Thomas Hobbes and his theory of social order. From his perspective, individual actors pursuing their own interests and trying to maximize their welfare lead inevitably to chaos and conflict. From that is derived the necessity of a single center of power imposing order. In Hobbes’ view, social order is the creation of the unique “Leviathan,” which wields the monopoly power to make and enforce law. Self-organized and independent individuals thus have nothing to do with making order. Most modern theories of “The State” have their origins in Hobbes’ vision of Leviathan.

Thomas Hobbes and his theories of the Leviathan have forged the foundation of industrialization. While at the time it seemed only applicable to the reverence of the church and royalty, it morphed once Adam Smith arrived in the 1700s. Even though Smith’s philosophy is the gospel of capitalism – his real message was much deeper and humane. To Smith, every business transaction is a moral challenge to see that both parties come out fairly. Unfortunately much of that message has been lost in transition or just discarded over the years for not fitting into greedy overlords’ predetermined agendas.

I suppose America can take solace in the fact that we’re not the only ones who choose to be subservient to a greater human power. In so-called industrial nations, industrialization isn’t necessary synonymous with being cerebrally evolved. In fact there’s a case to be made that industrialization has hindered our ability to make decisions for ourselves. Years of working for “the man” where “the man” makes our decisions for us; giving us long-term employment, health insurance and the such has cauterised our synapses – making us unable to forge the new cerebral pathways needed to function in a self-determinant society.

On the opposite end of the philosophical spectrum are the social constructs of 18th Century Scottish philosopher David Hume. Hume theorized that people are inherently good. What if rather than religiously following the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes (proponent of all-encompassing government) and his pessimistic views of humanity … we looked instead to Hume. He believed we were born with the virtues of benevolence, trust and commitment. This ‘spontaneous order’ did not need to be enforced by a greater overarching power or institution of human or theological making., but rather would individually and collectively be more efficient and ordered on its own. Hume’s argument was that, in the absence of a system of centralized command, conventions emerge that minimize conflict and organize social activities (including production) in a manner that is most conducive to the Good Life.

The No Fear Generation and Future of Healthcare

Let us not lose hope though. Even as us adults continue to fight over the toys in the toybox – the real adults in the room, our nation’s youth, all full of internal locus of control and self-efficacy, might actually be “the man in white hat on the white horse” riding in to save us. They don’t fear the system. They don’t expect the system to fix anything while they sit idly by. And they are not acting individually. They are taking the social media tools they’ve grown up with and are using them collectively as weapons to battle the unjust, inequitable system they see as functionally and morally wrong. Many call it a David and Goliath story – and that it may be. But because of their organizational and technical savvy, unbridled energy and intolerance of bullshit – today’s youth may actually be the Goliath. The status quo is walking dead and it doesn’t even know it.

The questions us adults should be asking ourselves is – how we be like the young and harness their sense of self-efficacy? How can we break free of the shackles that bind us to the couch as we get fatter and lazier pounding out keystrokes, parroting what we see in front of us on cable news.

While we could focus on the sad state of politics and civic engagement in this country – all that’s contingent on the more pressing issue of how do get and keep ourselves well. How do we decide that keeping ourselves physically, mentally and socially healthy is our responsibility – not of a healthcare system that we can all agree on is an operational disaster. And when we do – what steps must we take to set us on a path of self-efficacy and internal locus of control.

This internal locust of control needs to start with us by defining who each of us are and who we want to be. Then can we create an action plan to connect the two. This action plan is a road map for what I call our “Journey To Our Perfect World.” The emphasis is on the journey rather than the destination. Below are the ground rules for our new plan of self-actualization.

  • Our locus of control is internal: What we do as individuals matters to our health and well-being. We are not tools of fate. We understand many parties play a role – but we are the ones who have the greatest stake in the outcome of our actions. As a result; we may want to incorporate new ideas, additional players and new technologies to help us elevate our self-efficacy and improve outcomes.
  • We want collaboration: Our goal is positive health and well-being – and from whomever we choose to join us on this journey, we expect to work together collaboratively (including physicians, stakeholders, other friends and family and even fellow community members).
  • We are customers: At times we may be patients, some of us more and longer than others – but in the end, we’re still customers. And with being a customer comes choice, a choice that is ours.
  • Our community is an integral part of the solution: Not only do our own actions dictate the level of our health – so do our interactions with those around us where we live. We are products of our communities and the level of health is dependent on the engagements we have. The healthier and stronger our communities are – healthier and stronger we will be individually.

______________________

The Journey To Our Perfect World: The Map

  • Overview and Assessment:
    • Where do I want to go and when do I want to get there (personally and professionally)
    • Where have I been (personally and professionally)
    • Where I am now (personally and professionally)
  • Resources:
    • What do I need to go where I want to go (personally, from others)
    • What do I currently have
    • What do I need that I don’t current have and where can I get it

______________________

How can we demand the healthcare model I described above – one where we’re at the center of the process? How can we demand that our doctors and healthcare providers view us as true collaborators? How do we break the nonsensical cycle of unnecessarily procedures, appointments and tests that produce little benefit and only further perpetuate the inefficiencies of the status quo? How can we break the norm of thinking that our health begins and ends at the clinic walls? And how can we get our healthcare providers to see the community as integral part of our health and in turn use their power and financial resources to make it better?

In the end, it will be up to us to organize like David Hogg, Emma Gonzales, Jaclyn Corin and Cameron Kasky. Even though their cause is gun control … we can learn from them and the other young empowered leaders of the #neveragain movement. The healthcare industry won’t change on its own. It will have to be forced to – screaming and yelling … and throwing up unimaginable obstacles along the way . But we have power in numbers … and our numbers can speak truth to power … if we only dare.

We just need to keep screaming … and may we have half the insight, passion and courage Jaclyn does.

______________________

See Community 3.0 for your prescription for speaking truth to power by organizing your towns and cities around the Front Porches of your community by elevating the health and well-being of you, your neighbors and friends.

______________________

Related Posts:

The Evolution of the Theory of Evolution

Darwinism and the Paradox of Altruism

During the mid 1800s Charles Darwin upended both the scientific and religious worlds by releasing his seminal theory on biological evolution. Darwinism states that all species of organisms arise and develop through the natural selection of small, inherited variations that increase the individual’s ability to compete, survive, and reproduce. Since then Darwinism has been a foundational part of our world, science and elsewhere. However social behavior, specifically altruism, has posed a bit of problem for Darwin and his universal theory.

Every altruist has their own motives, of course – some are emotional, responding to fellow humans in desperate straits, while others are more rational, thinking about the kind of society they’d like to live in and acting accordingly. Does that imply a level of self-interest? Selfless acts often attract accusations of hidden selfishness, suggesting they’re not really altruistic at all. This wasn’t the problem for Darwinism. After all, humans have culture and religion and moral codes to live by – maybe our altruism was more to do with that than biology.

It was altruistic ants that posed a particular problem for Charles Darwin. Natural selection is often described as ‘survival of the fittest’, where fitness means how successful an individual is at reproducing. If one individual has a trait that gives them a fitness advantage, they will tend to have more offspring than the others; because the advantage is likely to be passed on to their offspring, that trait will then spread through the population. A fundamental part of this idea is that individuals are competing for the resources they need to reproduce, and fitness includes anything that helps an individual reproduce more than the competition.

But as Darwin observed, ants and other social insects are not in competition. They are cooperative, to the extent that worker ants are sterile and so have literally zero fitness. They ought to be extinct, yet there they are in every generation sacrificing their own reproductive ambitions to serve the fertile queen and her drones. Darwin suggested that competition between groups of ants – queen, drones and workers together – might be driving natural selection in this case. What was good for a nest competing against other nests would then outweigh what was good for any individual ant.

Group selection, as this idea was known, was not a very good solution, though. It didn’t explain how the cooperative behaviour evolved in the first place. The first altruistic ant would have been at such a huge disadvantage compared to the rest of its group that it would never have got the chance to breed more altruistic ants. The same was true of humans – natural selection was intrinsically stacked against any altruistic individual surviving long enough to pass on their altruism. (The Story of George Price)

This left a paradox: the evolution of altruism appeared to be impossible (under Darwin’s definition) … yet clearly altruism had evolved. If this couldn’t be resolved, what would it mean for the whole idea of natural selection?

Luckily, a young man called Bill Hamilton came to the rescue with a slightly different solution in 1964. He proposed that altruism could have evolved within family groups, whether genetically or through shared environmental habits and tendencies. An individual altruist would seem to be at a disadvantage, but that was not the whole picture because other individuals who shared the same genes associated with altruism would all influence each other’s “inclusive fitness.” We see this in human families also, as parents instinctively sacrifice themselves to protect their children, the upcoming generation. To not do this is considered socially malevolent.

Evolution and the Community

Hamilton’s extrapolation of Darwinism, while seemingly radical – made complete sense. By choosing to open the door to new thoughts on evolution – we’re not necessarily kicking Charles Darwin to curb, but expanding on his work based on new levels of research and observation. Consider it letting the theory of evolution evolve. Any scientific discovery should be looked at not an end – but rather the journey down a new road to another level of enlightenment.

The same should be said for social sciences and economic philosophy. We’re still relying on the theories and assumptions of Adam Smith and Thomas Hobbes from the 19th century – with our politics following in lock-step. Why shouldn’t our thinking in this area evolve also. The societal conditions faced by the inhabitants of 1800s are nothing like that we face today in 2017. To assume the models developed then would wholly apply now is naive … if not just intellectually lazy.

“I believe that the community – in the fullest sense: a place and all its creatures – is the smallest unit of health and that to speak of the health of an isolated individual is a  contradiction in terms.” – Wendell Berry

If we espouse Hamilton’s idea that evolution can occur in family units as well as in individuals – what’s saying we can’t take it a step further and extrapolate to that of the community unit. In fact, while technically ants socialize as a family, being from the same queen, they also (if not more) act as an active part of a community.

Recognizing that your community is an evolutionary ecosystem is fundamental to its prosperity and even survival.

Evolution ecoysystem cloudIf we view our community as an evolutionary unit, then we must look for and address the components that can either contribute to its sustainability or to its demise. A community is really nothing more than the accumulation of individuals and the interactions between these individuals. Every member of your community is unique and adds to its fabric. Everyone has something to offer and everyone should be heard – no matter their age or social standing. If they are not included int he conversation – they still will be heard and it may not be in a socially accepted way (e.g. crime). Prejudice, bigotry or even indifference hurts not only them, but us as part of the overall community. All of our actions, or lack there of – have collective consequences.

“In our every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations.” ~ IroquoisConfederacy

We must confront the societal questions that threaten the long-term sustainability of our communities – not just the immediate issues affecting the adult population . Far too often communities concern themselves only with protecting the status quo. This may not even be intentional. Informal power cliques that continue on by monopolizing public office and solidifying their positions of influence restrict the accension of new blood and new ideas in the community. For these civic leaders, they view the pain of changing greater than the pain of staying the same. Public policies, ideals and conventions are there to be preserved – often at all costs. New ideas meant to provide opportunity to new or young residents are resisted if not outright rejected … just because: “if it ain’t broken, then don’t fix it.” Unfortunately for those not in the top echelons of the ivory towers of power – it is broken. This needed new blood will either retreat into the shadows occupying a lower rung on caste system … or move somewhere else where opportunity is more available and their assets are welcome. Neither alternative is conducive to the prosperity and sustainability of the community.

Small town decay

Enter Darwinism! Those communities that embrace ideas from other diverse sources and talent with different experiences will evolve, sustain themselves and flourish. Those that “hold on to yesterday” will whither away. These communities and their residents will suffer from isolation, and lack of economic and social opportunities as they put forth precious time and resources resisting rather than embracing. By the time the pain of staying the same becomes more than that of changing … it may well be too late for them.

However hard it may seem for community leaders, they need to be willing to loosen their grip on power and traditional structure. They need to realize that what they invest in the outliers of power and influence today will be the capital that builds the future of the their communities in the future. Without this investment – the homes, businesses and everything else they’re trying to hold on to will be yet another example of the dark side of evolution … decline and eventual extinction.

We still need structure, but that structure needs to be flexible … and directly participatory. Our current form of local representative governance is seldom more than an ego-driven career path for the few. We need a structure that is more a platform; one of inclusion and participation. This platform must be designed to identify the needs and opportunities of the local community it serves while addressing them using whatever resources are available … whether monetary or not. Think of this “resource maximization” drawing from the times of our grandparents when neighbors and community members were treated as extended family and relied on as the primary “safety net.” This was a time when no one had the luxury of sitting by idly expecting a city council (who meets once a week) to act on their best interest – assuming they even took the time or had the ability to learn what those interests were.

Rhizomes

Biologists say trees are social beings. They can count learn and remember. They nurse sick members, warn each other of dangers by sending electrical signals across a fungal network and for reasons unknown, keep the ancient stumps of long felled companions alive for centuries by feeding them a sugar solution through roots. (Marije van Zomeren)

To find a model for organizational structure built around resource maximization and decentralized civic participation and collaboration, we need to look no further than our backyard – in nature. One of nature’s most effective means of sustainability is the Rhizome. The Rhizome is a modified subterranean stem of a plant that is usually found underground, often sending out roots and shoots from its nodes. Rhizomes develop from axillary buds and grow perpendicular to the force of gravity – retaining the ability to allow new shoots to grow upwards. If a Rhizome is separated into pieces, each piece may be able to give rise to a new plant … and a new node of above ground activity.

Rhizome
Credit: Debi Keyte-Hartland

A rhizome ceaselessly establishes connections between semiotic chains, organizations of power, and circumstances relative to the arts, sciences, and social struggles … the rhizome connects any point to any other point, and its traits are not necessarily linked to traits of the same nature; it brings into play very different regimes of signs, and even non-sign states … The rhizome operates by variation, expansion, conquest, capture, offshoots. A rhizome has no beginning or end; it is always in the middle, between things, interbeing, intermezzo. (A Thousand Plateaus)

This phenomena of decentralized activity in Rhizomes was best articulated in the philosophy or Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari in the ’60s. Rather than using the organizational structure of the root-tree system which charts along chronological lines and looks for the single origin of “things” looking towards conclusion of those “things” – a Rhizome continually establishes connections between threads of meaningful communication, organizations of power, and other influences (including arts, sciences and social struggles). The planar movement of the Rhizome resists chronology and formal organization, instead favoring a Nomadic system of growth and proliferation. In this model, influence and application spreads like the surface of a body of water, spreading towards available spaces or in the application of community – maximizing the resources available to it, regardless of the type. This is a perfect alternative to the governmental morass of dysfunction we’re currently immersed in.

Front Porches

At the foundation of this evolved, altrusitically-based society are its Front Porches – physical hubs of civic gathering and serendipitous engagement. The goal is to take the principles of resource maximization and provide the conduit to incorporate them with the naturalistic examples of the Rhizome organization articulated by Deleuze and Guattari. This result is a platform or space for community engagement and sustainability built around informal but operationally significant gatherings, otherwise know as Front Porches. While these Front Porches can form anywhere, say even in your garage, the ideal locations will be in the locally owned businesses of our communities.

Rather than myopically obsess on economic growth as almost all civic governments do, a Front Porch network will focus on destroying the silos that retard our communities’ evolution while improving its inhabitants physical, cerebral (avenues to self-actualization) and spiritual healthPeople will gravitate towards what they want to do … and in turn do what they do best. This lifestyle of self-management of interests and activities will not only benefit them, but also their community. Lives based on economic status will be replaced by those of self-actualization, self-efficacy and well-being. Civic participation and altruism will elevate them and empower them to evolve as humans – individually and collectively.

It will be the priority of these Front Porches to create environments in our communities that nurture hope by empowering avenues for us to engage with our world and express our creativity through a Solutionist mindset – letting the inherent benevolence inside us bloom. By making “helping others” our societal norm and expectation … we will supplant that of the hopeless climb up the ladder of our current economic caste system; countering the tribalism and jingoism that has reared recently shown itself to be in vogue.

Evolution through Diversity-Driven Serendipity

Rather than abide by a top-down governance model run by those embedded in the status quo (often of sustained mediocrity) – we must create platforms of serendipity where civic matchmaking happens organically through interaction uncovering commonalities between the participants. Think of a synergistic mixing bowl of opportunity; indirect, organic relationship building.

What if we designed our communities around the idea of maximizing engagement from those in the streets? The more engaged our residents are … the more empowered they would be. They would feel more in control of their health and their futures. Imagine if a chance to engage, whether it was physical, mental or social was just around the corner. What if our physical security and well-being was not dependent on government assistance or the whims of a fickle market driven economy. What if our neighborhood was our safety net, a safety net that knew best in our time of need. What if the streets of our community became melting pots of diversity-driven serendipity – places where curiosity was bred. What if engagement, well-being and self-efficacy was how a community measured itself, not obtuse economic activity too often distorted through the one-dimensional filter of irrelevant statistics. And what if getting up in the morning was a chance to nurture our hope … and engage with others to help them do the same.

Breaking Free of the Pendulum

It’s easy to just bash our present political economic situation and run the other way, ready to embrace the polar opposite. We saw this with the election of Donald Trump. Anything was better than Hillary Clinton and the establishment, however bad that might have been or not. We see it in economics with the pushback against neo-liberalism … for good reason. But does the answer lie on the other end of the pendulum and minimum basic income? Does it lie free college education for everyone, even though it’s becoming more apparent traditional college may not be the best alternative for many?

We need to be brave and think differently, not just vacillate between Smith and Hobbes or Marx. Not that those and other icons of the past don’t have positive offerings to contribute. But they don’t live today. Society changes, as does the economic conditions and requirements that forms it. And with that, so must our ways of looking at the best way to patch together a workable societal strategy for all. We need to grab from the past, morph together solutions … and try them out. Not all will work. But some parts of some of them will. And then we take those and combine them together with new ideas – all specific to our individual locales often brought to the forefront by our newly embraced outliers. Jeff Bezos from Amazon calls this Day 1Everything is always in beta – always in search of improvement. Always evolving. Never focusing on maintaining the status quo.

Bill Hamilton showed us how we need to accept alternative ways of looking at our world; even down to the most basic level – Darwin’s theory of evolution. I propose we take it further to the community. We don’t live in silos. While genetics play a vital role in ability to sustain ourselves individually and collectively … so do the interactions with those we share a physical space with. Any efforts to nurture empathetic and altruistic behavior is evolutionary beneficial.

It’s not enough to wait for a societal evolution to take place and expect other to generate the change we need. We can’t expect to sit back and reap the benefits from it after-the-fact. We need to all need to be our own local Bill Hamiltons, think differently … and usher in these evolutionary changes ourselves. We must look at our responsibility as being more than a periodic trip to the voting booth only to perpetuate yet another ineffective version of status quo.

…because we have reached a time when “the pain of staying the same has become greater than the pain of changing.”

__________________________

Related Posts:

Rhizomes and Front Porches: “A Cure for Societal Dysfunction”

“Small opportunities are often the beginning of great enterprises.” Demosthenes

In my last post, “Recognizing the Problem,” I vented my frustration, dismay and utter anger over the current political situation in the United States. But if I lived somewhere else, such as Great Britain, I’m sure my response would be similar. Regardless of the geography – it seems few governments can be considered worthy of the populace they supposedly represent.

Most can agree, the presence of Donald Trump and his circus put in a position of national power represents something malignant. But is he the cause or the symptom of the cancer? It’s probably safe to say it’s both – but I believe the latter holds greater weight. Our economic, physical and psychological dependence on government or some other sort of greater force to look over us has all but made us prey to any charlatan or clown, regardless the party, persuasion or power. Our current situation firmly underscores this fact. 

In several previous pieces, I have attempted to make the case for a societal effort to boost our collective self-efficacy.  In other words, we need to do a better job taking care of ourselves. And a “better job” should mean more than just us as individuals – but also our neighborhoods and communities.

Our government has proven to not only not be up to the task … they’ve morphed into a big part of the problem. But fortunately, the model for an alternative, one that emphasizes “we the people” not a self-serving hierarchy, may lie only as far away as our back yard.

Rhizomes and Decentralized Civic Engagement

Biologists say trees are social beings. They can count learn and remember. They nurse sick members, warn each other of dangers by sending electrical signals across a fungal network and for reasons unknown, keep the ancient stumps of long felled companions alive for centuries by feeding them a sugar solution through roots. (Marije van Zomeren)

To find a model for organizational structure built around resource maximization and decentralized civic participation and collaboration, we need to look no further than our backyard – in nature. One of nature’s most effective means of sustainability is the Rhizome. The Rhizome is a modified subterranean stem of a plant that is usually found underground, often sending out roots and shoots from its nodes. Rhizomes develop from axillary buds and grow perpendicular to the force of gravity. The Rhizome also retains the ability to allow new shoots to grow upwards. If a Rhizome is separated into pieces, each piece may be able to give rise to a new plant … and a new node of above ground activity.

rhizome
Credit: Debi Keyte-Hartland

“A rhizome ceaselessly establishes connections between semiotic chains, organizations of power, and circumstances relative to the arts, sciences, and social struggles … the rhizome connects any point to any other point, and its traits are not necessarily linked to traits of the same nature; it brings into play very different regimes of signs, and even non-sign states … The rhizome operates by variation, expansion, conquest, capture, offshoots.” A rhizome has no beginning or end; it is always in the middle, between things, interbeing, intermezzo. (A Thousand Plateaus)

This phenomena of decentralized activity in Rhizomes was best articulated in the philosophy or Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari in the ’60s. Rather than using the organizational structure of the root-tree system which charts causality along chronological lines and looks for the single origin of “things” and looks towards conclusion of those “things;” a Rhizome continually establishes connections between threads of meaningful communication, organizations of power, and other influences (including arts, sciences, and social struggles). The planar movement of the Rhizome resists chronology and formal organization, instead favoring a Nomadic system of growth and proliferation. In this model, influence and application spreads like the surface of a body of water, spreading towards available spaces or in the application of community – maximizing the resources available to it, regardless of the type. This is a perfect alternative to the governmental morass of dysfunction we’re current immersed in.

First we must build the vehicle. This vehicle is not a place or even a thing, but the collective journey of our community. It’s about movement. This journey happens on a metaphoric road or as Deleuze and Guattari call it, the Smooth Space.

  • The platform or naked infrastructure on which the community and in turn the array of “need and opportunity based activities” operate is called the Smooth Space. This platform is not formally defined, but rather takes the form of the influences that inhabit it. These influences can include meaningful communication, existing organizations (government and other) as well as social norms, ideals and community expectations. In the context of my model, Community 3.0, the Smooth Space is largely your community’s small business network or Front Porchesthe members of the community who are their customers, and the societal norms they create. What a community does and creates with its Smooth Space will determine the well-being of its populace. It is the duty of the Rhizome structure and its Smooth Space to accommodate and nurture the intangible, serendipitous, sensual and tactical engagements of all the members of its community (i.e. empathy, creativity, collaboration and self-actualization).

The vehicle is just a shell. Who we allow in and what we put in it is really what matters. Any shell can house extraordinary activity … or none at all. Those included must not be limited by the title and organization on their business card – but rather be a diverse array able move freely like a Nomad traveling where the food and opportunities lie.

  • Nomadism is a way of life that exists outside of the traditional organizational or societal norm (at least in modern times). The Nomad is a way of being in the middle or between points. It is characterized by movement and change, and is unfettered by systems of organization. The goal of the Nomad is only to continue to move within the “intermezzo.” (the journey rather than the destination). This constant state activity prevents itself from existing for the sake of existing as conventional organizations and institutions most often do. The goal is to make things happen, to find opportunities and solutions; not just to “be.” This Nomadic behavior also lends itself to the individual focusing on what interests them and where they can contribute the most, rather than just working within the constraints of a pre-defined, often inefficient role or job. In short, being a Nomad can greatly enhance ones sense of engagement and well-being. Or according to the Danish philosopher Søren Kiekegaard, be the evolved man.”

Once we have the vehicle and the people … we need the fuel. The fuel is the processes, the sociological assistance and prodding needed to propel the vehicle down the road. It’s not so much a thing, but the result of a community’s past behavior and the systems put in place to modify or continue on in the future. Deleuze and Guattari called this formless set of influences the Body Without Organs.

  • Body Without Organs is what happens. It is the result of what the Rhizome social philosophy using the Nomadic actions of its components operating on the Smooth Space. In itself the Body Without Organs has no form until the variables of the community are injected into it. The community’s personality and overall state of well-being are the result of the interactions between its populace and businesses; it is its Body Without Organs. It can take a conservative form or a progressive one. NIMBYism and gated communities or collaborative and communal. Closed and silos or tolerant and welcoming. Wall Street or Main Street. This is the community’s personality. But rather than the personality being dictated by those in the high rungs of a traditionally mandated hierarchy – it will come to form through the participation of those who live there … those on the streets, no matter their social stature. How the community directly responds to its needs and opportunities will be what it is.

Front Porches

At the foundation of this evolved, altrusitically-based society are its Front Porches – physical hubs of civic gathering and serendipitous engagement. The goal is to take the principles of resource maximization and provide the conduit to incorporate them with the naturalistic examples of the Rhizome organization articulated by Deleuze and Guattari. This result is a platform or space for community engagement and sustainability built around informal but operationally significant gatherings, otherwise know as Front Porches. While these Front Porches can form anywhere, say even in your garage, the ideal locations will be in the locally owned businesses of our communities.

Rather than myopically obsess on economic growth as almost all civic governments do, a Front Porch network will focus on destroying the silos that retard our evolution while improving physical, cerebral (avenues to self-actualization) and spiritual health.

People will gravitate towards what they want to do … and in turn do what they do best. This lifestyle of self-management of interests and activities will not only benefit them, but also their community. Lives based on economic status will be replaced by those of self-actualization and self-efficacy. Civic participation and altruism will elevate them and empower them to evolve as humans.

It will be the priority of these Front Porches to create environments in our communities that nurture hope by empowering avenues for us to engage with our world and express our creativity through a Solutionist mindset – letting the inherent benevolence inside us bloom. By making “helping others” our societal norm and expectation … we will supplant that of the hopeless climb up the ladder of our current economic caste system.

Well-being, Hope … and Changing Your Mind

What if we designed our communities around the idea of maximizing engagement. The more engaged our residents are … the more empowered they would be. They would feel more in control of their health and their futures. Imagine if a chance to engage, whether it was physical, mental or social was just around the corner. And what if opportunities to help others realize the same were part of the fabric our daily lives. What if our physical security and well-being was not dependent on government assistance or the whims of a fickle market driven economy. What if our neighborhood was our safety net, a safety net that knew best in our time of need. And what if the streets of our community became melting pots of serendipity – places where curiosity was bred and benevolence was the norm.

What if engagement, well-being and self-efficacy was how a community measured itself, not obtuse economic activity often distorted through the one-dimensional filter of irrelevant statistics. What if we fixated on what we “could” and “will,” rather than what we “can’t” or “won’t.” And what if getting up in the morning was a chance to nurture our hope … and engage with others to help them do the same.

Your community, where you physically live, will turn into one of problem solving where everything and everyone is a resource. Your community will be revitalized. New businesses will be created. Not those derived from Wall Street chains and franchises, but ones of ideas born in your community and run by people from your community. These will be the businesses that provide the genesis for the future to build on by turning into Front Porches – ensuring your legacy and prosperity.

ChangeYourMind.jpg

It’s obvious the human species must evolve. But to do this, we will have to change our thinking. Instead of relying on past expectations, cultural assumptions and metrics as our guides — we have to envision what could be, not just what always has been.

But the vision is only part of the journey. We have to look past how things in past have been done. No longer should government and traditional institutions be looked at as the first line defense … rather should be looked at only as a last resort. Our reaction should be to assemble our friends and neighbors at our local Front Porch, organize and do what has to be done — developing self-efficacy along the way.

We can make the change we need — but it won’t be by thinking the way we’ve always thought and doing what we’ve always done — the way it’s always been done.

“If not us … then who? If not now … then when?”

If you’re interested in moving on from the status quo that will inevitably take anyone and anything down with it … please check out Community 3.0, my vision of an evolved society where self-efficacy and the well-being is priority. Or even better email me, at clayforsberg@gmail.com and we can set up time to have a conversation.

___________________________________________

Related Posts:

Life during Trump, Part 1: “Recognizing the Problem”

“The mind…can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.” ― John Milton

It’s hard for people to empathize with you when you’re going through chemo. I’m not looking for sympathy and I’m not saying people don’t try. It’s just one of those tough subjects. There’s always that specter of death that hangs over the conversation. This possible prognosis, correct or not –  supersedes any discussion of “how you’re doing.”

It’s hard to explain that things just change. And it’s more than just physically. The nausea gets all the attention, But that’s never been an issue with me. It’s a lot more than that. My senses has changed. I don’t smell, or hear, or taste or see like I used. Whether or not they’ll come back  remains to be seen. After my first “rodeo” my senses recovered some, but not entirely. And I’m sure with this latest group of treatments (I hate that term) this sensory wet blanket that I’m dragging around will probably be my new companion for the foreseeable future. Linus has nothing on me.

Mainly what people can’t understand is the mental changes that occur. I guessing it’s not unlike what PTSD sufferers deal with. Around every corner, there’s a trigger that can set off a memory that’ll send you into reactionary tailspin. In a wonderful book by Debbie Hampton, she re-accounts her recover from a suicide attempt where she injected over 90 pills. She literally fried her brain. It was so damaged she had to relearn how to live and with that her impulse control was severely impacted. Because of her frequent outbursts, her friends and family such had hard time dealing with it many just stayed away – including her mother. She had to rebuild her life mentally and physically, block by block, encumbered by this new uninhibited broken brain as its foundation.

By no means am I dealing with anything like what Debbie did, or probably still is. But I do get the brain change thing as my patience and tolerance level has been affected … big time. My world has triggers everywhere now. Most of time we go through life and just let irritating things pass us by without much notice – at least not letting it affect us. Such is not the case with me since chemo has fried my brain. I like to describe it like an archipelago. During normal tide, only a few of the islands are visible. But now I’m in a constant state of low tide. Everything is visible and everything affects me.

All this being said … it bring us to the insane asylum on the east coast, better know as Washington D.C. What’s happening in our political wasteland is having a big effect on me right now – culminating with the latest antics of the Republican Congress and the clown boy in the White House. For many the healthcare legislation ramrodded through the House by Paul Ryan is nothing short of a bus hitting us. I try to get my head around all of it and inject some reason into their decision making process – but I can’t. The group think that has reared its grotesque head is a modern-day tulip mania of Sherman’s March to the Sea (how’s that for a mixed metaphor). The insane mindset that has taken over this party is completely void of any compassion, empathy or even basic humanity. The days of Bob Dole and even Ronald Reagan are long dead. The zombie that has taken its place bares little resemblance.

Unfortunately I can’t just turn off the television, quit looking at my Twitter stream or let my newspapers pile up on the front porch and wait for it to all go away. I’m front and center on the preexisting condition issue. If all this comes to fruition (as in the poison fruit), I’ll be at the mercy of my greedy insurance company. Combine this with the crazy state my brain is in right now, and I’m spending time figuring how to stockpile and freeze chemo drugs from my current treatment sessions while I’m still covered – to be used if I need them in the future, if (more probable when) my insurance company drops me or prices me out of the market. Welcome to life in Montana, land of cowboys, guns and extremely limited healthcare options. I have to constantly remind myself of the John Milton quote, “The mind can make heaven of hell or hell of heaven,” to keep from digressing into obsession.

The man on the white horse, the man in the white hat … well, neither one of them are coming.

Running of Trump’s Lemmings

Regardless of my personal situation or more accurately, my perception of it … we can’t dismiss reality. If the picture couldn’t get any clearer – looking to these clowns in political zuit suits for the answer is pure insanity. Even someone with chemo brain can tell you that. Yet Trump supporters still support him and Republicans are, and probably will always be Republicans.

But not to be left out of the delusion soiree, Democrats still think that if they put someone of theirs in the White House, the federal government will magically become a bastion of implementation prowess. Regardless of who sits in the Oval Office – our country’s, and more importantly our individual problems will not be fixed.

Last Thursday night, I had very disheartening conversation with my daughter. Now Alex is a bright young woman in the midst of a very successful career with tours of duty at Apple and Amazon. She is grounded and informed, but her logical mind is having a very hard time understanding how this country, one that she has always felt even in times of craziness – will do the right thing. But after Thursday, those assumptions have been shattered. For her it was like realizing there’s no Santa Claus. With the this healthcare legislation, the Republicans have not just targeted the “outsiders” – but rather the very people who worship them and put them in power. The level betray is unprecedented. At least Hitler didn’t kill the Germans he viewed (in his demented mind) to be his true countrymen.

It’s safe to say “we the people” are on our own. We can only hope we have enough resolve individually and collectively to fend off the daily assaults waged on us by those we’ve entrusted to look after our interests. May today be the day we take our institutional naivete′ and bury it with the illusions of Santa Claus and the blanket we slept with when we were two years old.

Since Trump has taken the reigns as leader of the free world (theres’s so much wrong using those words together in one sentence), the mental health industry has seen a dramatic rise is suicide calls and psychiatric activity. Bluntly speaking, people are depressed. Normally optimistic people are seeing their world view might have been based on flawed assumptions.

Personally I’m not ready to throw in the towel on humanity. I’m still an ardent believer in David Hume’s philosophical premise that people are intrinsically good – not that of Thomas Hobbes and the need for a Leviathan overlord. I believe we just need to reset our social and civic perspective. No white anything, hat nor horse, is going to pay our house payment or make us healthy. That is up to us. The sooner we admit to this, like the alcoholic or the ten a hydrocodone a day housewife – the sooner we can get onto fixing what needs to be fixed.

Self-Efficacy and the Road to Recovery

In the past I’ve been accused of assuming people have too much control over their own destinies. Upbringing, environment, genetics or even belief in a higher being I’m often told are the determining factors – no matter what their own efforts. If you’re not white, probably male and connected – the deck is stacked against you. Getting dealt a “bad hand” is grounds for government intervention and assistance. Most recently, the in vogue means of this assistance is basic income – getting paid for basically existing and being a member of society. I’m all for the betterment of all people. Anyone who knows me or has read any of my 200+ posts on this blog will attest to that. In fact, that’s probably the one common tenet that runs through the entire site. That being said, I can’t believe a reward with no incentive to accomplish anything is the best way to achieve it.

Shouldn’t the road to our Perfect World be paved with the something that will produce a longer-lasting effect than just a monthly sustenance? Shouldn’t we base our societal actions around the assumption if we better ourselves good things will come for both us and those around us? It’s the “giving a man a fish vs. teaching him how to fish” thing in the Bible. And I don’t believe this is even a political issue anymore. Regardless of your ideological affiliation, relying on the government (or any other institution for that matter) to actually deliver is naive at best.

Shouldn’t we strive to create communities and social constructs that move us in a direction that empowers people? Shouldn’t we be teaching people how to fish – working with them to obtain the physical, mental and social tools they’ll need to not just persist, but flourish on a long-term basis? At the core of this empowerment is building a communal sense of self-efficacy.

Self-efficacy is defined as the extent or strength one believes in their own ability to complete tasks and reach goals. The more a person believes their actions will help their situation, the more likely they are to try. The key is to “get the ball rolling” by nudging activity and engagement – personally, socially and civically. The more a person does, the more they’re likely to do. And the more they do, the more they feel what they’re doing is helping … creating a cascade of positive results and well-being.

In America there is little effort put into getting people to engage directly with their health and personal well-being on the part of the established healthcare industry. Maybe providers are reluctant to relinquish control. Maybe it’s they just can’t be bothered. Regardless, the country lives by a healthcare methodology of reaction and “fixing things” … not proaction and “maintaining things.” It’s no big stretch to believe that transferring some of the responsibility for our own health to the ourselves will prove beneficial to us. And it’s not just focusing on the physical that creates impact. Developing one’s mental acuity is not unlike getting into physical shape. Having a stronger mind is the key to having better resolve and making better decisions in the first place. And schools should not have exclusive rights to that. Opportunities to learn and strengthen our minds are all around us all the time. We need to engage with our surroundings (people, places and things) to take realize the benefit though.

We can’t leave out the social component of well-being either. Using altruism and benevolence as a cornerstone by doing good things for others takes your mind off of your own ailments and gives you purpose. And even if you can’t actively participate in hands-on volunteer projects, you can at least feel you part of the solution by experiencing the joy of giving vicariously through passive attendance and moral support.

What we need is not a society where we look to institutions for the answers – whether it be the government, the healthcare industry or any other. We spend all our time and energy arguing over which institution and which version or it is best for us. And even if we agree, we never even discuss whether our interests are best served by any institution. The thought of responsibility and by association, self-efficacy, is too often mis-interrepted and dismissed as heartless libertarianism. While the personal responsibility calling can go a bit far … so can and has the leviathan of the institutional overlord. 

We need to resist the extremes. Full-on libertarianism isn’t the answer anymore than being beholden to the keeper of the keys of the Ivory Tower. We need to decentralize and deconstruct our current support structure but yet be vulnerable enough to depend on our neighbors and communities. We need to reach out and grab those close to us where we live and help … and allow ourselves to be helped. To do that, we need to engage. And the perfect model for this type of engagement may be only as far as our backyards.

Part 2 will take us into the “life of plants” and how patterning our lives around a model of engagement designed after a rhizome root structure found in our backyards might be the solution to the personal, civic and political malaise we’re presently immersed in. Out on May 16.

If you’re interested in moving on from the status quo that will inevitably take anyone and anything down with it … please check out Community 3.0, my vision of an evolved society where self-efficacy and the well-being of the populace is priority. Or even better email me, at clayforsberg@gmail.com and we can set up time to have a conversation.

___________________________________________

Related Posts:

What if things would never be the same again …

Update, January 24, 2017: I wrote this five years ago during the midst of the Occupy Movement and the Arab Spring. The change that many of us hoped for never happened. What is happening in the United States today is a whole different matter. Our federal government, and many of the state governments, are hell-bent on imposing upon us their version of change which is nothing more than a dictatorial societal retreat. While not identical, the message of this post parallels our situation today. The status quo isn’t an option – and maybe it shouldn’t be. Progress is not linear. It’s a series of lunges forward, steps back and deep breaths. Patience and persistence must always be with us.

______________________________________________________

Published December 15, 2011

Yesterday TIME magazine came out with their “Person of the Year” award. It wasn’t really a person, well not just one. TIME’s “Person of the Year” was “the Protestor.” By it’s very definition a protestor objects to the status quo. Protestors want change. We saw this in the Middle East and the “Arab Spring” and we’re seeing it here – first with Occupy Wall Street and now occupations across the United States and the world.

“Are you ready for change?”

It’s obvious that we are in a period of transition, a period of change. And whether we like it or not, there’s nothing we can do about it. But what if the change was so profound that, “things would never be the same again?”

What if unemployment didn’t drop? What if our “do nothing” government did nothing? What if corporate America didn’t start hiring – but rather continued to ship jobs oversees and spend their ballooning profits on productivity  rather than people?

What if the realization finally sets in that a college degree no longer provides that fail-safe career protection. Instead of the promise of a BMW in the garage and an ever-increasing 401K – you get a five if not six figure school loan debt. And no longer does getting a higher education land you that decade long dream job with a Fortune 500 company.

What if investing in that “white picket fence” doesn’t provide that retirement security it did for you parents. What if buying that house did nothing but turn you up-side down, and send you underwater because of that reworked mortgage you thought was such a good deal at the time. And what if that same mortgage not only strapped you today, but also anchored you to an area where employment opportunities were slim at best … far away from the new hotbeds economic success.

Unfortunately too much of the time, we evaluate ourselves by the money we have in bank, the toys we have in the garage and the address on that diploma on the wall. As we’re finding out now, and as our predecessors found out, times of change, “times when things aren’t the same anymore” – monetary worth is fragile. We may try to hedge, set up backup plans and do whatever we can to preserve our “things” – but we can’t stop the wheels of change. And often our “things” get run over in the process.

If we choose to pursue a life based on security and the preservation of the status quo, we have to make assumptions, assumptions based on the past and the value systems of prior generations. Unemployment will drop, college is a safe bet, buying a house is your retirement and success is “things” – may no longer be relevant.

But “what if things would never be the same again.” What would you do?

A few years ago, I saw a movie about life after an economic and societal meltdown. Things that were valuable before, were no long. And those taken for granted, such as water and gasoline – were invaluable.

Now I’m not predicting Armageddon, but it’s obvious that we’re staring right in the face of change – not just here, but worldwide. What you hold near and dear, may soon be gone. That security that was always first and foremost in your mind, may now become nothing but a memory of “the good old days.” All the constants you believed in … are now just more variables, variables you have to figure out. What are you going to do?

You have two options. You can hang on to yesterday – a yesterday that may never be again. Or you can look forward to living life differently – shedding yourselves of the same, the convenient, the comfortable – and replacing it with the unpredictable, the inconvenient and the exciting. Rather than fearing the inevitable change, what if you embraced it? What if you built your life and raised your children to expect the unexpected and be prepared for it.

When I say unexpected though … I don’t necessarily mean bad. Not having rock-solid security is not a death sentence, it’s not a cancer diagnosis. In fact it may be the key that unlocks the door of your self-imposed prison. Imagine every morning you looked forward to what the day could bring you, who you could meet – that opportunity that could change your life for the better. Imagine this … rather than worrying about what wasn’t in place or what could happen when you retire.

One thing we know for sure – things change. They’re not going to be same tomorrow as they were yesterday, no matter how much you may want it to be. The only question will be is how you handle it.

“The mind can make heaven of hell … and hell of heaven.”

Personally I don’t do well in the heat, how about you?

________________________________________________________________

Related posts: