Can marketing and social media coexist?

I posted this as a comment on a LinkedIn discussion forum in the group “Marketing Your Printing Company.”  I’ve pretty much thought of this as my approach since I started down the social media trail.  It’s kinda nice to have it down a paper though.

I think we need to look at the entire process of a sale. The old adage is you need seven impressions on a prospect to make a sale. When I was a headhunter I tracked the numbers and found this more or less accurate.

With social media however – what constitutes an impression? We know back in the “dark ages,” an impression was a phone call or personal letter. With the advent of the internet, emails were also thrown into the mix. But does an email carry the same weight a letter? Probably not. And for that matter, does a word processed letter carry the same weight as one hand addressed? Again, probably not.

Facebook, Twitter ... oh my, what's best!

When we bring social media into the equation, we have to also look at the weight factor. If you’re receiving the same tweet as 400 or even 4000 other people – what’s that worth. Minimal at best. If the tweet includes a @yourname, then it’s worth more. And if the tweet gets your prospect or customer to go to your site or blog (and hopefully stay there for a few minutes), it could be worth as much as a phone conversation. Social media is just another avenue to make impressions. And after enough quality impressions, the goal of gaining or retaining business … should be realized. But quality isn’t about tweeting to the universe and expecting magic.

I’m not a big believer in social media as a lead generation tool. But then again I’m not a big believer in any campaign that doesn’t start with a targeted prospect that you know at least some information on. But with social media, you can gather information on your prospect. For example by using Twitter, you can find out an awful lot about someone. From their tweets you can see what they’re interested in, and if they blog – you find out what they’re passionate about. I’d be hard pressed to find a better avenue into someone’s head than this. But you must have the patience and desire to use this information constructively.

My social media methodology is not to generate random leads, but to build relationships and credibility with people I enjoy spending time with. Through my blogs, comments, tweets and other content I put out there – I hope to come across as someone who people will entrust their business with. That’s assuming what I was offering was pertinent, and that’s assuming I was offering something at all. Most importantly, I hope I would attract the type of people I share interests with and who I want to do business with.

Now my business is different from most. I would suppose the more unique the company is, the more applicable my methodology would be. Heck, I’ve been working on an “elevator speech” for four years trying to succinctly describe what I do – but still to no avail.

Regardless – as in any marketing effort, results from social media marketing take time. It’s no short cut – no matter what the “gurus” profess. Whatever the road you take to your company on, it’s going to take work and persistence. It’s kind of like Thomas Edison said, “Success is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration.”

All this bring’s up a bigger question. What is the purpose of social media? Is the purpose of a blog different from that of Twitter or even Facebook? Much attention is made of the financial implications of marketing “socially.” But is that really why we do it? Is marketing the reason why we stay up way later than we should, and wake up saying good morning to our Facebook friends and Twitter followers before even our family, just down the hall.

I’m willing to think … probably not.

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If you like what you read … please Tweet and follow me on Twitter at @clayforsberg

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